Thursday, 31 January 2013

Samsara Blu-ray Review

Here is a documentary so difficult to describe it’s hard to understand the motivation to watch it never mind to think that you’d like it. A wordless documentary filmed over twenty-five countries in five continents, it’s all about the imagery and the accompanying music so that you may interpret it as you wish. All the images you see are completely magnanimous  with every interpretation being as correct as every other as there’s no guiding voice to narrate you to the thoughts of the filmmakers. Instead, you see images that he’s captured over fours of filming on seventy-millimetre film while it transports you around the globe seamlessly. It seemingly melts societies from one place to another showing that there may be differences but we are all the same and suffer similar tribulations.

TO READ THE FULL REVIEW CLICK HERE

Thursday, 24 January 2013

My Afternoons with Margueritte Blu Review

My Afternoons with Margueritte Blu Review
Gerard Depardieu plays Germain Chavez who is a handyman, gardening illiterate who is mocked by the village for his stupidity, even by those that are supposed to be his friends. One day in the park he sits on a bench next a little old woman named Margueritte (Gisele Casadesus) who both have a common interest in the pigeons that congregate in that area of the park. In this, a friendship blossoms in the most rare and random of circumstances. Margueritte is a book worm who rifles through books and books for the lovely lyrical sound of literature and linguistics which she then tries to handover to Germain. An illiterate cannot have the love of literature that she does making her his teacher for the rest of the film, teaching him the lovely French language and pushing him into trying something that his past has scarred him too much to attempt.


TO READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW CLICK HERE

Monday, 21 January 2013

Objectified Blu Review

Objectified Blu-ray Cover
The synopsis on this Blu-ray is quite misleading because the reading of it comes across as how objects own our lives and that they’re very controlling whether we realize it or not. What follows is very surface level about that idea but instead is a film about patting the back of designers who create the things we use. It’s incredibly disappointing when being misled into believing that there’ll be an insight into how the world looks into our consumerism, our necessity for things, how these things control us. Instead, what you get is a documentary about the creation of objects which can be quite interesting but most of the times is about stroking the egos of those who create every day things that we take for granted and how they're underrated geniuses. Self-indulgent to say the least.

TO READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW CLICK HERE.

Saturday, 12 January 2013

Hayley-Marie Axe Interview

Hayley-Marie Axe
In today’s new cinema release, we chat to Hayley-Marie Axe who plays Val in new British black-comedy ‘May I Kill U?’ Although you may not have seen her on the screen that much as she’s mostly been in theatre, keep watching an actress who has tipped to be an up-and-comer with an insatiable love of acting. Hayley-Marie is also a virally successful actress in a few online web shows that have proven to be quite successful in America which is a clever way to globalise herself.
We were lucky enough to have the pleasure to talk to Hayley-Marie about how her dedication to the character carries over when we talk to her about film, curtains and becoming a serial killer.


TO READ THE INTERVIEW CLICK HERE

Friday, 11 January 2013

Les Misérables Review


Les Misérables Anne Hathaway poster
Les Misérables the musical at last gets the big picture treatment. Sometimes it can be hard to find the words to effectively describe films. Others you passionately love enough to gush on romantically about how fantastic every minute detail of it is. Others you loathe so much that the hatred spills out of you with every acidic word spitting its disapproval on the page to warn others. Then there are the middle-films. The films you neither dislike nor like. The films that sit in the middle with no real adequate description of something average bar the word average. Les Misérables is that sort of film and it could be summed up with a two and a half hour recording of “mehhhhhhhhhhh” with the exclusion of Anne Hathaway’s I Dreamed a Dream being the only fantastic moment.
CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW

Thursday, 10 January 2013

The Impossible Controversy

The Impossible screenshot
In one of the earliest releases of 2013 there’s already been a massive controversy surrounding one of the films. The Impossible  has been criticised heavily for reasons that are possibly oversensitive. Could it be that the world is becoming overly-sensitive in its need for censorship?And if it is a need for censorship, will we ruin the freedom of art? It’s an almost archaic question of the past century as censorship of films and television is becoming too predominant in our culture. Censorship is an evil which infects art by diluting its bloodstream, thinning it for no good reason, ruining it. Thin blood is no good for the life stream of art. Unless it needs Warfarin.

CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW

May I Kill U? DVD Review

May I Kill U?
No matter how much you see Kevin Bishop around, it’s hard to get the memory of him in The Muppets’ Treasure Island out of your mind. This film does try quite hard to distance him from the childhood film that birthed the comedic actor, going from a Muppet helper to a murdering cycling policeman who gains notoriety and fame for his vigilantism.  Where it’s a bit heavy-handed with the social commentary with characters all seemingly agreeing with his ways and few, if any, questioning them until the third act, it’s a bit weak with challenging the vigilante. It could be a comment on how extreme it has now become; it comes off more as a bit shallow in the writing.


CLICK HERE TO READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW

Tuesday, 8 January 2013

Peep Show Season 8 DVD Review

Peep Show Season 8 DVD Cover
Hearing the familiarity of the theme tune blast through the TV set will fill you with joy if you’re already a fan of Peep Show. If you’ve somehow not seen the brilliance that is Peep Show then you can go buy them all on DVD or even catch up now on Channel 4′s 4oD service. That way you won’t be lost in the El Dude brothers’ story nor of how incapable they are. You’ll be used to standard antics of the characters, their dialect and their paradoxical ways. What’s the most impressive part is how after eight seasons of these children not at all growing up but changing only their surroundings and a few friends here and there that it’s still fresh. Maybe the familiarity adds to that but it’s been so long now that it’s hard to see these actors as anyone different. Mark Corrigan and Jeremy Usborne are real people.

TO READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW CLICK HERE

Top Ten: A Look Back at the Best Films of 2012

Sound of My Voice Screencap
To start this off, I want to establish that this is all my opinion and only my opinion. It does not reflect the views of HeyUGuys nor anyone else on here intentionally and this is entirely an opinion piece.
Another thing to establish is that I’ve unfortunately not seen every film of 2012 because my bank balance won’t allow it… that and the fact I have university and other stuff to do. These silly things have gotten in the way but the major contenders that I have missed so far are Rust & Bone, The Master, The Turin Horse, Samsara, Chronicle, The Hobbit, Life of Pi and so many more. In fact, there are something like 280+ films that need to be watched this year and I, unfortunately, haven’t seen them all so the list is subject to change in the future when I finally catch up in 2036 so check back then for an official list.
For now, you’ll have to live with this list from the 47 films that are eligible for this year that I can remember. Hopefully you’ll all agree and I won’t ruffle too many feathers. I’d put my honourable mentions here but I’d rather draw out tension and suspense as the rankings go in and the omissions become more shocking!

TO READ THE REST OF THE ARTICLE CLICK HERE

The Whale DVD Review

The Whale DVD Cover

Cast: Ryan Reynolds
Director: Suzanne Chisholm, Michael Parfit
Country: Canada
Genre: Documentary
Official Trailer: Here
Animals are the best, aren’t they? They’re uncomprehending of the things around them to our extent but they develop these relationships like we do—with other animals as well as us. Animals are lovely creatures on the whole and you can bond with anything as long as you show it affection from the off; you can almost manipulate nature to an extent, fight the instincts for something nice and if animals can do this then so can we: there’s no excuse for hostility really. A digression but it links to this documentary about a killer whale who’s as much a killer as a week-old kitten. Luna is looking for love, family and friendship after losing contact with his family. He’s seeking out for all the things that we crave but attention more than anything else. Poor Luna.

TO READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW CLICK HERE

The Invisible War DVD Review

The Invisible War DVD Cover

Cast: Helen Benedict, Anu Bhagwati, Susan Burke
Director: Kirby Dick
Country: USA
Genre: Documentary | Crime | Drama | History
Official Trailer: Here
The plot of this documentary alone is one of incredible frustration. After reading it, it’s shocking enough as it is and when you finally press play, it only gets worse and your feeling of disgust intensifies. There are a lot of problems with the armed forces, many of which are ignored because of the dangerous nature of their careers, this is one of the things that is ignored within it and really shouldn’t be. This documentary helps cement the fact that respect should be earned and not given automatically because of your title. It’s the reason why respect for soldiers goes overboard as they get privileges that others don’t because of the risk involved with their work that they voluntarily sign up for.


TO READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW CLICK HERE

The World is Ending... Let's Watch How it Might! Seven Big-Screen Apocalypses


Although it’s Christmas time, mistletoe and wine, children singing something rhyme, there’s a sense of dread slightly dampening the mood. Getting into the spirit is difficult when some Mayans have selfishly predicted the end of the world just four days before Jesus’s birthday. There’s a sense of gloom from our impending doom that has been predicted. What better way to think of the gloom then to dwell in it and surround yourself with end of the world films; whether they’re surviving a post-apocalyptic event or it’s a countdown to a full demolition of the world. Let’s look at the best films that depict the end of the world, celebrate with these, and maybe even take notes on how to survive.
Here’s the list of films about the end of the world before the world ends, whether they’re films that are great to make you feel bad about the world ending but you could even watch a few that are so bad that’ll it’ll deserve to end.

TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE CLICK HERE

The Legend of Neil DVD Review

The Legend of Neil DVD Cover
We’ve all had the fantasy to be sucked into an alternate reality. Whether it be a game, film, TV programme or a book, we’ve all wanted it to happen. The idea of being sucked into Zelda is probably one that a lot of people have fantasised about. Being sucked into a world as a hero, saving a princess and defeating the evil overlord that is Gannon(dorf). Neil (Tony Janning) is the lucky one that gets sucked into the game after one night getting drunk, asphyxiating himself while masturbating which somehow transported him into the game – as the song goes. From the off, with the lowest of production values for the first season, it is absolutely hilarious. Although the episodes – webisodes is probably more fitting – are only clocking in at two minutes, they’re worthwhile two minutes but as they kick in they end abruptly which is a bit disappointing. Thankfully, now that they’re available on DVD, you can watch them all at once.


TO READ THE FULL REVIEW CLICK HERE

Farewell, My Lovely DVD Review

Farewell, My Lovely picture
This is the third adaptation of Raymond Chandler’s Farewell, My Lovely but the first under its real name. The other two incarnations are the 1942’s The Falcon Takes Over and 1944’s Murder, My Sweet but this is the more faithful one of the movement to the big screen. In true, neo-noir fashion, it begins with the protagonist caught in a problem of him being blamed for two murders. It starts with the voiceover summing up in a roundabout way until he picks up the phone to the police. “Come alone” is the last thing said to the policeman so he can explain it all; it’s when he meets the policeman that he begins to tell us his story.


TO READ THE REST OF THE REVIEW CLICK HERE